When will we see the end of T1s?

A T1 line is a connection that’s used with voice or data (or sometimes both!) These lines were once laid using copper wire, but more recently, optical fiber has also been used for effective data transmission. They can carry several channels for both digital data and telephone calls and have been a significant innovation since the 1960s. Since this time, there have been some major changes in connectivity and the rise of Ethernet and cell phone networks is slowly leaving T1s behind.

At over 50 years old, it’s no surprise that the use of this technology is starting to decline, but it still has its advantages in areas where major carriers cannot provide services. T1 lines are incredibly reliable (more so than their analog counterparts), and they can handle multiple  people sharing the line at the same time. However, by today’s standards, they cannot support the demand for high-speed Internet usage.

T1 capabilities

T1s have been invaluable for businesses that are not able to get services like DSL and cable internet, and are not yet big enough for an Ethernet Line. Unlike other connectivity options, T1 lines provide a guaranteed speed and they do not have the same problems with distance from the exchange compared to DSL services. With this reduced interruption, this internet connection also provides Service Level Agreements (SLAs) that gives you peace of mind that you will receive a dedicated level of service from the provider as per the agreement. This can help to support uptime and keep businesses running without disruption. T1 lines can also provide guaranteed performance for applications in real-time, such as voice and video calling, as they are not affected by contention ratios (how many other people are using the service at any one time). This is unlike DSL, cable and Uverse/Fios.

T1 drawbacks

While they are reliable, they can also be expensive; especially for people in very rural areas. This is even more so when there is a high bandwidth requirement. Checking the price of T1 internet connectivity with a supplier that can compare multiple networks (such as TelcoSolutions), is essential. The networks are constantly laying cables, so what may be true one month, is not necessarily true the next.

Due to the cost of T1 circuits, high bandwidth businesses will often base themselves in areas served by fiber. These tend to be strategic moves, and with the cost of a well-served area’s Ethernet being similar to a T1 Price (but with approximately 10x the bandwidth), the world is moving on.

Nonetheless, all is not lost for the trusty T1. Unlike some of the newer services that are unavailable nationwide, you’ll find you have access to a T1 line without too many issues. As the networks build out their infrastructure, this will change, but T1s are not going to disappear any time soon. It has been talked about for the past decade that T1s can no longer support advancements of the Internet and in customer demand. That said, for people that don’t have access to wireless, DSL or cable services, it is no wonder T1’s still play an essential part in connectivity.

For a while, cell networks were thought to offer a solution. Operators are now starting to look at covering broader areas, but the issue of rural internet connectivity is here to stay.

When we see the end of T1 line usage?

The extensive network that is required to connect everyone in the country with Internet services will require a considerable investment by ISPs for often-small subsets of people. At present, the viability of funding such large ventures is not something that is being actively promoted, but in the future, it may just become a reality. Until that time, T1s will still be an essential feature for connectivity for many locations across the country.